0
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found
      Is Open Access

      3D imaging of human organs with micrometer resolution - applied to the endocrine pancreas

      research-article

      Read this article at

      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          The possibility to quantitatively study specific molecular/cellular features of complete human organs with preserved spatial 3D context would have widespread implications for pre-clinical and clinical medicine. Whereas optical 3D imaging approaches have experienced a formidable revolution, they have remained limited due to current incapacities in obtaining specific labelling within large tissue volumes. We present a simple approach enabling reconstruction of antibody labeled cells within entire human organs with preserved organ context. We demonstrate the utility of the approach by providing volumetric data and 3D distribution of hundreds of thousands of islets of Langerhans within the human pancreas. By assessments of pancreata from non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic individuals, we display previously unrecognized features of the human islet mass distribution and pathology. As such, this method may contribute not only in unraveling new information of the pancreatic anatomy/pathophysiology, but it may be translated to essentially any antibody marker or organ system.

          Abstract

          Hahn et al. present a method to visualize the endocrine human pancreas in 3D and calculate volumetric data. Using immunolabeling to visualize targets of interest and in reconstructing large tissue parts from imaged cm3-sized tissue blocks, they use their method to reveal previously unknown morphological differences in the endocrine pancreas affected with type 2 diabetes.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 38

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Reconstruction of zebrafish early embryonic development by scanned light sheet microscopy.

          A long-standing goal of biology is to map the behavior of all cells during vertebrate embryogenesis. We developed digital scanned laser light sheet fluorescence microscopy and recorded nuclei localization and movement in entire wild-type and mutant zebrafish embryos over the first 24 hours of development. Multiview in vivo imaging at 1.5 billion voxels per minute provides "digital embryos," that is, comprehensive databases of cell positions, divisions, and migratory tracks. Our analysis of global cell division patterns reveals a maternally defined initial morphodynamic symmetry break, which identifies the embryonic body axis. We further derive a model of germ layer formation and show that the mesendoderm forms from one-third of the embryo's cells in a single event. Our digital embryos, with 55 million nucleus entries, are provided as a resource.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Cell and tissue autofluorescence research and diagnostic applications.

             Monica Monici (2004)
            Cells contain molecules, which become fluorescent when excited by UV/Vis radiation of suitable wavelength. This fluorescence emission, arising from endogenous fluorophores, is an intrinsic property of cells and is called auto-fluorescence to be distinguished from fluorescent signals obtained by adding exogenous markers. The majority of cell auto-fluorescence originates from mitochondria and lysosomes. Together with aromatic amino acids and lipo-pigments, the most important endogenous fluorophores are pyridinic (NADPH) and flavin coenzymes. In tissues, the extracellular matrix often contributes to the auto-fluorescence emission more than the cellular component, because collagen and elastin have, among the endogenous fluorophores, a relatively high quantum yield. Changes occurring in the cell and tissue state during physiological and/or pathological processes result in modifications of the amount and distribution of endogenous fluorophores and chemical-physical properties of their microenvironment. Therefore, analytical techniques based on auto-fluorescence monitoring can be utilized in order to obtain information about morphological and physiological state of cells and tissues. Moreover, auto-fluorescence analysis can be performed in real time because it does not require any treatment of fixing or staining of the specimens. In the past few years spectroscopic and imaging techniques have been developed for many different applications both in basic research and diagnostics.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found
              Is Open Access

              Islet β cell mass in diabetes and how it relates to function, birth, and death

              In type 1 diabetes (T1D) β cell mass is markedly reduced by autoimmunity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) results from inadequate β cell mass and function that can no longer compensate for insulin resistance. The reduction of β cell mass in T2D may result from increased cell death and/or inadequate birth through replication and neogenesis. Reduction in mass allows glucose levels to rise, which places β cells in an unfamiliar hyperglycemic environment, leading to marked changes in their phenotype and a dramatic loss of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS), which worsens as glucose levels climb. Toxic effects of glucose on β cells (glucotoxicity) appear to be the culprit. This dysfunctional insulin secretion can be reversed when glucose levels are lowered by treatment, a finding with therapeutic significance. Restoration of β cell mass in both types of diabetes could be accomplished by either β cell regeneration or transplantation. Learning more about the relationships between β cell mass, turnover, and function and finding ways to restore β cell mass are among the most urgent priorities for diabetes research.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Contributors
                Ulf.Ahlgren@umu.se
                Journal
                Commun Biol
                Commun Biol
                Communications Biology
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2399-3642
                10 September 2021
                10 September 2021
                2021
                : 4
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.12650.30, ISNI 0000 0001 1034 3451, Umeå Centre for Molecular Medicine, , Umeå University, ; Umeå, Sweden
                [2 ]GRID grid.8993.b, ISNI 0000 0004 1936 9457, Department of Immunology, Genetics and Pathology, , Uppsala University, ; Uppsala, Sweden
                Article
                2589
                10.1038/s42003-021-02589-x
                8433206
                34508173
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100004973, Barndiabetesfonden;
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100004359, Vetenskapsrådet (Swedish Research Council);
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100009708, Novo Nordisk Fonden (Novo Nordisk Foundation);
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/100008871, JDRF;
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100007067, Kempestiftelserna (Kempe Foundations);
                Funded by: FundRef https://doi.org/10.13039/501100004885, Umeå Universitet (Umeå University);
                Funded by: Diabetes Wellness (Sverige) Swedish national strategic research initiative EXODIAB
                Categories
                Article
                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2021

                Comments

                Comment on this article