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      Materials and Structures toward Soft Electronics

      1 , 2 , 1 , 1 , 3 , 1 , 4
      Advanced Materials
      Wiley

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          Preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper.

          Free-standing paper-like or foil-like materials are an integral part of our technological society. Their uses include protective layers, chemical filters, components of electrical batteries or supercapacitors, adhesive layers, electronic or optoelectronic components, and molecular storage. Inorganic 'paper-like' materials based on nanoscale components such as exfoliated vermiculite or mica platelets have been intensively studied and commercialized as protective coatings, high-temperature binders, dielectric barriers and gas-impermeable membranes. Carbon-based flexible graphite foils composed of stacked platelets of expanded graphite have long been used in packing and gasketing applications because of their chemical resistivity against most media, superior sealability over a wide temperature range, and impermeability to fluids. The discovery of carbon nanotubes brought about bucky paper, which displays excellent mechanical and electrical properties that make it potentially suitable for fuel cell and structural composite applications. Here we report the preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper, a free-standing carbon-based membrane material made by flow-directed assembly of individual graphene oxide sheets. This new material outperforms many other paper-like materials in stiffness and strength. Its combination of macroscopic flexibility and stiffness is a result of a unique interlocking-tile arrangement of the nanoscale graphene oxide sheets.
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            Three-dimensional flexible and conductive interconnected graphene networks grown by chemical vapour deposition.

            Integration of individual two-dimensional graphene sheets into macroscopic structures is essential for the application of graphene. A series of graphene-based composites and macroscopic structures have been recently fabricated using chemically derived graphene sheets. However, these composites and structures suffer from poor electrical conductivity because of the low quality and/or high inter-sheet junction contact resistance of the chemically derived graphene sheets. Here we report the direct synthesis of three-dimensional foam-like graphene macrostructures, which we call graphene foams (GFs), by template-directed chemical vapour deposition. A GF consists of an interconnected flexible network of graphene as the fast transport channel of charge carriers for high electrical conductivity. Even with a GF loading as low as ∼0.5 wt%, GF/poly(dimethyl siloxane) composites show a very high electrical conductivity of ∼10 S cm(-1), which is ∼6 orders of magnitude higher than chemically derived graphene-based composites. Using this unique network structure and the outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of GFs, as an example, we demonstrate the great potential of GF/poly(dimethyl siloxane) composites for flexible, foldable and stretchable conductors. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved
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              A stretchable carbon nanotube strain sensor for human-motion detection.

              Devices made from stretchable electronic materials could be incorporated into clothing or attached directly to the body. Such materials have typically been prepared by engineering conventional rigid materials such as silicon, rather than by developing new materials. Here, we report a class of wearable and stretchable devices fabricated from thin films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes. When stretched, the nanotube films fracture into gaps and islands, and bundles bridging the gaps. This mechanism allows the films to act as strain sensors capable of measuring strains up to 280% (50 times more than conventional metal strain gauges), with high durability, fast response and low creep. We assembled the carbon-nanotube sensors on stockings, bandages and gloves to fabricate devices that can detect different types of human motion, including movement, typing, breathing and speech.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Advanced Materials
                Adv. Mater.
                Wiley
                0935-9648
                1521-4095
                August 27 2018
                December 2018
                August 02 2018
                December 2018
                : 30
                : 50
                : 1801368
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Department of NanoengineeringUniversity of California San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA
                [2 ]School of Materials Science and EngineeringNational Engineering Research Center for Advanced Polymer Processing TechnologySchool of Physics and EngineeringZhengzhou University Zhengzhou Henan 450001 P. R. China
                [3 ]State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated DevicesUniversity of Electronic Science and Technology of China Chengdu Sichuan 610054 P. R. China
                [4 ]Materials Science and Engineering ProgramUniversity of California San Diego La Jolla CA 92093 USA
                Article
                10.1002/adma.201801368
                a1d37ac7-14a0-495a-afff-ba58cf129f05
                © 2018

                http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/termsAndConditions#vor

                http://doi.wiley.com/10.1002/tdm_license_1.1

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