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      Proteomic and biochemical analyses of human B cell-derived exosomes. Potential implications for their function and multivesicular body formation.

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          Abstract

          Exosomes are 60-100-nm membrane vesicles that are secreted into the extracellular milieu as a consequence of multivesicular body fusion with the plasma membrane. Here we determined the protein and lipid compositions of highly purified human B cell-derived exosomes. Mass spectrometric analysis indicated the abundant presence of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and class II, heat shock cognate 70, heat shock protein 90, integrin alpha 4, CD45, moesin, tubulin (alpha and beta), actin, G(i)alpha(2), and a multitude of other proteins. An alpha 4-integrin may direct B cell-derived exosomes to follicular dendritic cells, which were described previously as potential target cells. Clathrin, heat shock cognate 70, and heat shock protein 90 may be involved in protein sorting at multivesicular bodies. Exosomes were also enriched in cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and ganglioside GM3, lipids that are typically enriched in detergent-resistant membranes. Most exosome-associated proteins, including MHC class II and tetraspanins, were insoluble in 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonic acid (CHAPS)-containing buffers. Multivesicular body-linked MHC class II was also resistant to CHAPS whereas plasma membrane-associated MHC class II was solubilized readily. Together, these data suggest that recruitment of membrane proteins from the limiting membranes into the internal vesicles of multivesicular bodies may involve their incorporation into tetraspanin-containing detergent-resistant membrane domains.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          J Biol Chem
          The Journal of biological chemistry
          American Society for Biochemistry & Molecular Biology (ASBMB)
          0021-9258
          0021-9258
          Mar 28 2003
          : 278
          : 13
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Cell Biology, Utrecht University Medical Centre and Institute of Biomembranes, Room G02.525, Heidelberglaan 100, 3585 CX Utrecht, The Netherlands.
          Article
          S0021-9258(19)32371-3
          10.1074/jbc.M207550200
          12519789
          adb7b522-3830-4348-b3d4-d994cf478473
          History

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