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      Phase Modulators Based on High Mobility Ambipolar ReSe2 Field-Effect Transistors

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          Abstract

          We fabricated ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) from multi-layered triclinic ReSe2, mechanically exfoliated onto a SiO2 layer grown on p-doped Si. In contrast to previous reports on thin layers (~2 to 3 layers), we extract field-effect carrier mobilities in excess of 10^2 cm^2/Vs at room temperature in crystals with nearly ~10 atomic layers. These thicker FETs also show nearly zero threshold gate voltage for conduction and high ON to OFF current ratios when compared to the FETs built from thinner layers. We also demonstrate that it is possible to utilize this ambipolarity to fabricate logical elements or digital synthesizers. For instance, we demonstrate that one can produce simple, gate-voltage tunable phase modulators with the ability to shift the phase of the input signal by either 90^o or nearly 180^o. Given that it is possible to engineer these same elements with improved architectures, for example on h-BN in order to decrease the threshold gate voltage and increase the carrier mobilities, it is possible to improve their characteristics in order to engineer ultra-thin layered logic elements based on ReSe2.

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          Single-Layer MoS2 Phototransistors

           Hong Li,  Hai Li,  Zongyou Yin (2013)
          A new phototransistor based on the mechanically-exfoliated single-layer MoS2 nanosheet is fabricated and its light-induced electric properties are investigated in details. Photocurrent generated from the phototransistor is solely determined by the illuminated optical power at a constant drain or gate voltage. The switching behavior of photocurrent generation and annihilation can be completely finished within ca. 50 ms and it shows good stability. Especially, the single-layer MoS2 phototransistor exhibits a better photoresponsivity as compared with the graphene-based device. The unique characteristics of incident-light control, prompt photoswitching and good photoresponsivity from the MoS2 phototransistor pave an avenue to develop the single-layer semiconducting materials for multi-functional optoelectronic device applications in future.
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            Control of Schottky barriers in single layer MoS2 transistors with ferromagnetic contacts.

            MoS2 and related metal dichalcogenides (MoSe2, WS2, WSe2) are layered two-dimensional materials that are promising for nanoelectronics and spintronics. For instance, large spin-orbit coupling and spin splitting in the valence band of single layer (SL) MoS2 could lead to enhanced spin lifetimes and large spin Hall angles. Understanding the nature of the contacts is a critical first step for realizing spin injection and spin transport in MoS2. Here, we have investigated Co contacts to SL MoS2 and find that the Schottky barrier height can be significantly decreased with the addition of a thin oxide barrier (MgO). Further, we show that the barrier height can be reduced to zero by tuning the carrier density with back gate. Therefore, the MgO could simultaneously provide a tunnel barrier to alleviate conductance mismatch while minimizing carrier depletion near the contacts. Such control over the barrier height should allow for careful engineering of the contacts to realize spin injection in these materials.
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              Thickness-Dependent Interfacial Coulomb Scattering in Atomically Thin Field-Effect Transistors

              Two-dimensional semiconductors are structurally ideal channel materials for the ultimate atomic electronics after silicon era. A long-standing puzzle is the low carrier mobility ({\mu}) in them as compared with corresponding bulk structures, which constitutes the main hurdle for realizing high-performance devices. To address this issue, we perform combined experimental and theoretical study on atomically thin MoS2 field effect transistors with varying the number of MoS2 layers (NLs). Experimentally, an intimate relation is observed with a 10-fold degradation in {\mu} for extremely thinned monolayer channels. To accurately describe the carrier scattering process and shed light on the origin of the thinning-induced mobility degradation, a generalized Coulomb scattering model is developed with strictly considering device configurative conditions, i.e., asymmetric dielectric environments and lopsided carrier distribution. We reveal that the carrier scattering from interfacial Coulomb impurities (e.g., chemical residues, gaseous adsorbates and surface dangling bonds) is greatly intensified in extremely thinned channels, resulting from shortened interaction distance between impurities and carriers. Such a pronounced factor may surpass lattice phonons and serve as dominant scatterers. This understanding offers new insight into the thickness induced scattering intensity, highlights the critical role of surface quality in electrical transport and would lead to rational performance improvement strategies for future atomic electronics.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                10 August 2018
                Article
                1808.03621

                http://arxiv.org/licenses/nonexclusive-distrib/1.0/

                Custom metadata
                Scientific Reports 2018
                cond-mat.mes-hall

                Nanophysics

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