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      An index to quantify an individual's scientific research valid across disciplines

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          Abstract

          The number h of papers with at least h citations has been proposed to evaluate individual's scientific research production. This index is robust in several ways but yet strongly dependent on the research field. We propose a complementary index hI = h^2/N_t, with N_t being the total number of authors in the considered h papers. A researcher with index hI has hI papers with at least hI citation if he/she had published alone. We have obtained the rank plots of h and hI for four Brazilian scientific communities. Contrasting to the h-index curve, the hI index present a perfect data collapse into a unique allowing comparison among different research areas.

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          How Popular is Your Paper? An Empirical Study of the Citation Distribution

           S Redner (1998)
          Numerical data for the distribution of citations are examined for: (i) papers published in 1981 in journals which are catalogued by the Institute for Scientific Information (783,339 papers) and (ii) 20 years of publications in Physical Review D, vols. 11-50 (24,296 papers). A Zipf plot of the number of citations to a given paper versus its citation rank appears to be consistent with a power-law dependence for leading rank papers, with exponent close to -1/2. This, in turn, suggests that the number of papers with x citations, N(x), has a large-x power law decay N(x)~x^{-alpha}, with alpha approximately equal to 3.
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            Does the h-index for ranking of scientists really work?

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              Are citations of scientific papers a case of nonextensivity ?

              The distribution \(N(x)\) of citations of scientific papers has recently been illustrated (on ISI and PRE data sets) and analyzed by Redner [Eur. Phys. J. B {\bf 4}, 131 (1998)]. To fit the data, a stretched exponential (\(N(x) \propto \exp{-(x/x_0)^{\beta}}\)) has been used with only partial success. The success is not complete because the data exhibit, for large citation count \(x\), a power law (roughly \(N(x) \propto x^{-3}\) for the ISI data), which, clearly, the stretched exponential does not reproduce. This fact is then attributed to a possibly different nature of rarely cited and largely cited papers. We show here that, within a nonextensive thermostatistical formalism, the same data can be quite satisfactorily fitted with a single curve (namely, \(N(x) \propto 1/[1+(q-1) \lambda x]^{q/{q-1}}\) for the available values of \(x\). This is consistent with the connection recently established by Denisov [Phys. Lett. A {\bf 235}, 447 (1997)] between this nonextensive formalism and the Zipf-Mandelbrot law. What the present analysis ultimately suggests is that, in contrast to Redner's conclusion, the phenomenon might essentially be one and the same along the entire range of the citation number \(x\).
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                2005-09-06
                2005-10-27
                Article
                10.1007/s11192-006-0090-4
                physics/0509048
                Custom metadata
                Scientometrics, Vol. 68, No. 1 179--189 (2006)
                Major changes made. To be submitted to Scientometrics
                physics.soc-ph

                General physics

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