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      Food-sharing vampire bats are more nepotistic under conditions of perceived risk

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      Behavioral Ecology

      Oxford University Press (OUP)

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          Most cited references 41

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          The arcsine is asinine: the analysis of proportions in ecology

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            COANCESTRY: a program for simulating, estimating and analysing relatedness and inbreeding coefficients.

             Jinliang Wang (2010)
            The software package COANCESTRY implements seven relatedness estimators and three inbreeding estimators to estimate relatedness and inbreeding coefficients from multilocus genotype data. Two likelihood estimators that allow for inbred individuals and account for genotyping errors are for the first time included in this user-friendly program for PCs running Windows operating system. A simulation module is built in the program to simulate multilocus genotype data of individuals with a predefined relationship, and to compare the estimators and the simulated relatedness values to facilitate the selection of the best estimator in a particular situation. Bootstrapping and permutations are used to obtain the 95% confidence intervals of each relatedness or inbreeding estimate, and to test the difference in averages between groups. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.
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              Empathy and pro-social behavior in rats.

              Whereas human pro-social behavior is often driven by empathic concern for another, it is unclear whether nonprimate mammals experience a similar motivational state. To test for empathically motivated pro-social behavior in rodents, we placed a free rat in an arena with a cagemate trapped in a restrainer. After several sessions, the free rat learned to intentionally and quickly open the restrainer and free the cagemate. Rats did not open empty or object-containing restrainers. They freed cagemates even when social contact was prevented. When liberating a cagemate was pitted against chocolate contained within a second restrainer, rats opened both restrainers and typically shared the chocolate. Thus, rats behave pro-socially in response to a conspecific's distress, providing strong evidence for biological roots of empathically motivated helping behavior.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Behavioral Ecology
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1045-2249
                1465-7279
                March 01 2017
                April 01 2017
                February 05 2017
                March 01 2017
                April 01 2017
                February 05 2017
                : 28
                : 2
                : 565-569
                Article
                10.1093/beheco/arx006
                © 2017

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