162
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares

      Call for Papers: Sex and Gender in Neurodegenerative Diseases

      Submit here before September 30, 2024

      About Neurodegenerative Diseases: 3.0 Impact Factor I 4.3 CiteScore I 0.695 Scimago Journal & Country Rank (SJR)

      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: found

      Prevalence of Dementia in the United States: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study

      research-article

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Aim: To estimate the prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and other dementias in the USA using a nationally representative sample. Methods: The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study sample was composed of 856 individuals aged 71 years and older from the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study (HRS) who were evaluated for dementia using a comprehensive in-home assessment. An expert consensus panel used this information to assign a diagnosis of normal cognition, cognitive impairment but not demented, or dementia (and dementia subtype). Using sampling weights derived from the HRS, we estimated the national prevalence of dementia, AD and vascular dementia by age and gender. Results: The prevalence of dementia among individuals aged 71 and older was 13.9%, comprising about 3.4 million individuals in the USA in 2002. The corresponding values for AD were 9.7% and 2.4 million individuals. Dementia prevalence increased with age, from 5.0% of those aged 71–79 years to 37.4% of those aged 90 and older. Conclusions: Dementia prevalence estimates from this first nationally representative population-based study of dementia in the USA to include subjects from all regions of the country can provide essential information for effective planning for the impending healthcare needs of the large and increasing number of individuals at risk for dementia as our population ages.

          Related collections

          Most cited references21

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Alzheimer disease in the US population: prevalence estimates using the 2000 census.

          Current and future estimates of Alzheimer disease (AD) are essential for public health planning. To provide prevalence estimates of AD for the US population from 2000 through 2050. Alzheimer disease incidence estimates from a population-based, biracial, urban study, using a stratified random sampling design, were converted to prevalence estimates and applied to US Census Bureau estimates of US population growth. A geographically defined community of 3 adjacent neighborhoods in Chicago, Ill, applied to the US population. Alzheimer disease incidence was measured in 3838 persons free of AD at baseline; 835 persons were evaluated for disease incidence. Main Outcome Measure Current and future estimates of prevalence of clinically diagnosed AD in the US population. In 2000, there were 4.5 million persons with AD in the US population. By 2050, this number will increase by almost 3-fold, to 13.2 million. Owing to the rapid growth of the oldest age groups of the US population, the number who are 85 years and older will more than quadruple to 8.0 million. The number who are 75 to 84 years old will double to 4.8 million, while the number who are 65 to 74 years old will remain fairly constant at 0.3 to 0.5 million. The number of persons with AD in the US population will continue to increase unless new discoveries facilitate prevention of the disease.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            The prevalence of dementia: A quantitative integration of the literature

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: found

              The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study: Study Design and Methods

              Objective: We describe the design and methods of the Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS), a new national study that will provide data on the antecedents, prevalence, outcomes, and costs of dementia and ‘cognitive impairment, not demented’ (CIND) using a unique study design based on the nationally representative Health and Retirement Study (HRS). We also illustrate potential uses of the ADAMS data and provide information to interested researchers on obtaining ADAMS and HRS data. Methods: The ADAMS is the first population-based study of dementia in the United States to include subjects from all regions of the country, while at the same time using a single standardized diagnostic protocol in a community-based sample. A sample of 856 individuals age 70 or older who were participants in the ongoing HRS received an extensive in-home clinical and neuropsychological assessment to determine a diagnosis of normal, CIND, or dementia. Within the CIND and dementia categories, subcategories (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia) were assigned to denote the etiology of cognitive impairment. Conclusion: Linking the ADAMS dementia clinical assessment data to the wealth of available longitudinal HRS data on health, health care utilization, informal care, and economic resources and behavior, will provide a unique opportunity to study the onset of CIND and dementia in a nationally representative population-based sample, as well as the risk factors, prevalence, outcomes, and costs of CIND and dementia.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                NED
                Neuroepidemiology
                10.1159/issn.0251-5350
                Neuroepidemiology
                S. Karger AG
                0251-5350
                1423-0208
                2007
                November 2007
                29 October 2007
                : 29
                : 1-2
                : 125-132
                Affiliations
                Departments of aPsychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and bMedicine (Neurology), Duke University Medical Center, Durham, N.C., cDivision of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, and dInstitute for Social Research, University of Michigan, and eVeterans Affairs Center for Practice Management and Outcomes Research, Ann Arbor, Mich., fRAND, Santa Monica, Calif., and gColleges of Public Health and Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, USA
                Article
                109998 PMC2705925 Neuroepidemiology 2007;29:125–132
                10.1159/000109998
                PMC2705925
                17975326
                caee3190-39d7-4e97-a695-56b60b52bad6
                © 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel

                Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

                History
                Page count
                Tables: 5, References: 49, Pages: 8
                Categories
                Original Paper

                Geriatric medicine,Neurology,Cardiovascular Medicine,Neurosciences,Clinical Psychology & Psychiatry,Public health
                Population-based research,Aging,Epidemiology,Dementia

                Comments

                Comment on this article