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      The Response of Soil CO2 Fluxes to Progressively Excluding Vertebrate and Invertebrate Herbivores Depends on Ecosystem Type

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          Most cited references 59

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          Global consequences of land use.

          Land use has generally been considered a local environmental issue, but it is becoming a force of global importance. Worldwide changes to forests, farmlands, waterways, and air are being driven by the need to provide food, fiber, water, and shelter to more than six billion people. Global croplands, pastures, plantations, and urban areas have expanded in recent decades, accompanied by large increases in energy, water, and fertilizer consumption, along with considerable losses of biodiversity. Such changes in land use have enabled humans to appropriate an increasing share of the planet's resources, but they also potentially undermine the capacity of ecosystems to sustain food production, maintain freshwater and forest resources, regulate climate and air quality, and ameliorate infectious diseases. We face the challenge of managing trade-offs between immediate human needs and maintaining the capacity of the biosphere to provide goods and services in the long term.
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            Ecological linkages between aboveground and belowground biota.

            All terrestrial ecosystems consist of aboveground and belowground components that interact to influence community- and ecosystem-level processes and properties. Here we show how these components are closely interlinked at the community level, reinforced by a greater degree of specificity between plants and soil organisms than has been previously supposed. As such, aboveground and belowground communities can be powerful mutual drivers, with both positive and negative feedbacks. A combined aboveground-belowground approach to community and ecosystem ecology is enhancing our understanding of the regulation and functional significance of biodiversity and of the environmental impacts of human-induced global change phenomena.
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              On the Temperature Dependence of Soil Respiration

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Ecosystems
                Ecosystems
                Springer Nature America, Inc
                1432-9840
                1435-0629
                November 2013
                May 21 2013
                November 2013
                : 16
                : 7
                : 1192-1202
                Article
                10.1007/s10021-013-9676-x
                © 2013
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