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      Sex differences in post-exercise fatigue and function in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome

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          Abstract

          To assess biobehavioral sex differences in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) utilizing a low burden exercise protocol, 22 females and 15 males with ME/CFS and 14 healthy controls underwent two six-min walk tests. Fifteen daily assessments were scheduled for fatigue and function ratings and heart monitoring. Six-min walk tests were conducted on days 8 and 9. The ME/CFS group showed high self-report fatigue and impaired physical function, whereas healthy controls did not show fatigue or function abnormalities. In patients, no significant post-exercise changes were found for heart rate variability (HRV); however, heart rate decreased in ME/CFS males from Day 14 to Day 15 ( p = 0.046). Female patients showed increased fatigue ( p = 0.006) after the initial walk test, but a downward slope ( p = 0.008) in fatigue following the second walk test. Male patients showed a decrease in self-report work limitation in the days after exercise ( p = 0.046). The healthy control group evidenced a decrease in HRV after the walk tests from Day 9–14 ( p = 0.038). This pilot study did not confirm hypotheses that females as compared to males would show slower exercise recovery on autonomic or self-report (e.g. fatigue) measures. A more exertion-sensitive test may be required to document prolonged post-exertional abnormalities in ME/CFS.

          Trial registration: NCT NCT03331419.

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          Psychometric properties of the 42-item and 21-item versions of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales in clinical groups and a community sample.

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              The fatigue severity scale. Application to patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus.

              Fatigue is a prominent disabling symptom in a variety of medical and neurologic disorders. To facilitate research in this area, we developed a fatigue severity scale, subjected it to tests of internal consistency and validity, and used it to compare fatigue in two chronic conditions: systemic lupus erythematosus and multiple sclerosis. Administration of the fatigue severity scale to 25 patients with multiple sclerosis, 29 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, and 20 healthy adults revealed that the fatigue severity scale was internally consistent, correlated well with visual analogue measures, clearly differentiated controls from patients, and could detect clinically predicted changes in fatigue over time. Fatigue had a greater deleterious impact on daily living in patients with multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus compared with controls. The results further showed that fatigue was largely independent of self-reported depressive symptoms and that several characteristics could differentiate fatigue that accompanies multiple sclerosis from fatigue that accompanies systemic lupus erythematosus. This study demonstrates (1) the clinical and research applications of a scale that measures fatigue severity and (2) helps to identify features that distinguish fatigue between two chronic medical disorders.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
                fred.friedberg@stonybrookmedicine.edu
                Journal
                Sci Rep
                Sci Rep
                Scientific Reports
                Nature Publishing Group UK (London )
                2045-2322
                3 April 2023
                3 April 2023
                2023
                : 13
                : 5442
                Affiliations
                [1 ]GRID grid.36425.36, ISNI 0000 0001 2216 9681, Department of Psychiatry, , Stony Brook University, ; L10-060Y, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8101 USA
                [2 ]GRID grid.214572.7, ISNI 0000 0004 1936 8294, Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, , University of Iowa, ; 340 Iowa Avenue, G60 PBSB, Iowa City, IA 52242 USA
                [3 ]GRID grid.412695.d, ISNI 0000 0004 0437 5731, School of Nursing, Health Sciences Center, ; Level 2, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8240 USA
                [4 ]GRID grid.51462.34, ISNI 0000 0001 2171 9952, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, ; 641 Lexington Avenue, 7Th Floor, New York, NY 10022 USA
                [5 ]GRID grid.36425.36, ISNI 0000 0001 2216 9681, Renaissance School of Medicine, , Stony Brook University, ; L3-108, 101 Nicolls Road, Stony Brook, NY 11794-8036 USA
                Article
                32581
                10.1038/s41598-023-32581-w
                10070276
                37012343
                e5bef459-6779-4773-a7f9-7fd5c3b258db
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Open Access This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons licence, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article's Creative Commons licence, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article's Creative Commons licence and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this licence, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.

                History
                : 13 December 2022
                : 29 March 2023
                Funding
                Funded by: FundRef http://dx.doi.org/10.13039/100000056, National Institute of Nursing Research;
                Award ID: R01NR015850
                Award Recipient :
                Categories
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                Custom metadata
                © The Author(s) 2023

                Uncategorized
                biomarkers,signs and symptoms
                Uncategorized
                biomarkers, signs and symptoms

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