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      Impact of Reported Beta-Lactam Allergy on Inpatient Outcomes: A Multicenter Prospective Cohort Study

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          Most cited references 13

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          Infectious Diseases Society of America and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America guidelines for developing an institutional program to enhance antimicrobial stewardship.

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            Drug allergy: an updated practice parameter.

             ,  ,   (2010)
            Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) result in major health problems in the United States in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. ADRs are broadly categorized into predictable (type A and unpredictable (type B) reactions. Predictable reactions are usually dose dependent, are related to the known pharmacologic actions of the drug, and occur in otherwise healthy individuals, They are estimated to comprise approximately 80% of all ADRs. Unpredictable are generally dose independent, are unrelated to the pharmacologic actions of the drug, and occur only in susceptible individuals. Unpredictable reactions are subdivided into drug intolerance, drug idiosyncrasy, drug allergy, and pseudoallergic reactions. Both type A and B reactions may be influenced by genetic predisposition of the patient
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              Health care use and serious infection prevalence associated with penicillin "allergy" in hospitalized patients: A cohort study.

              Penicillin is the most common drug "allergy" noted at hospital admission, although it is often inaccurate. We sought to determine total hospital days, antibiotic exposures, and the prevalence rates of Clostridium difficile, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) in patients with and without penicillin "allergy" at hospital admission. We performed a retrospective, matched cohort study of subjects admitted to Kaiser Foundation hospitals in Southern California during 2010 through 2012. It was possible to match 51,582 (99.6% of all possible cases) unique hospitalized subjects with penicillin "allergy" to 2 unique discharge diagnosis category-matched, sex-matched, age-matched, and date of admission-matched control subjects each. Cases with penicillin "allergy" averaged 0.59 (9.9%; 95% CI, 0.47-0.71) more total hospital days during 20.1 ± 10.5 months of follow-up compared with control subjects. Cases were treated with significantly more fluoroquinolones, clindamycin, and vancomycin (P < .0001) for each antibiotic compared with control subjects. Cases had 23.4% (95% CI, 15.6% to 31.7%) more C difficile, 14.1% (95% CI, 7.1% to 21.6%) more MRSA, and 30.1% (95% CI, 12.5% to 50.4%) more VRE infections than expected compared with control subjects. A penicillin "allergy" history, although often inaccurate, is not a benign finding at hospital admission. Subjects with a penicillin "allergy" history spend significantly more time in the hospital. Subjects with a penicillin "allergy" history are exposed to significantly more antibiotics previously associated with C difficile and VRE. Drug "allergies" in general, but most those notably to penicillin, are associated with increased hospital use and increased C difficile, MRSA, and VRE prevalence. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Clinical Infectious Diseases
                Clin Infect Dis.
                Oxford University Press (OUP)
                1058-4838
                1537-6591
                September 12 2016
                October 01 2016
                : 63
                : 7
                : 904-910
                Article
                10.1093/cid/ciw462
                © 2016

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