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      Social determinants of health inequalities

      The Lancet
      Elsevier BV

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          Abstract

          The gross inequalities in health that we see within and between countries present a challenge to the world. That there should be a spread of life expectancy of 48 years among countries and 20 years or more within countries is not inevitable. A burgeoning volume of research identifies social factors at the root of much of these inequalities in health. Social determinants are relevant to communicable and non-communicable disease alike. Health status, therefore, should be of concern to policy makers in every sector, not solely those involved in health policy. As a response to this global challenge, WHO is launching a Commission on Social Determinants of Health, which will review the evidence, raise societal debate, and recommend policies with the goal of improving health of the world's most vulnerable people. A major thrust of the Commission is turning public-health knowledge into political action.

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          Most cited references9

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          The Millennium Project: a plan for meeting the Millennium Development Goals.

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            Widening socioeconomic inequalities in mortality in six Western European countries

            During the past decades a widening of the relative gap in death rates between upper and lower socioeconomic groups has been reported for several European countries. Although differential mortality decline for cardiovascular diseases has been suggested as an important contributory factor, it is not known what its quantitative contribution was, and to what extent other causes of death have contributed to the widening gap in total mortality.
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              Human Development Report 2003

              (2003)
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                The Lancet
                The Lancet
                Elsevier BV
                01406736
                March 2005
                March 2005
                : 365
                : 9464
                : 1099-1104
                Article
                10.1016/S0140-6736(05)71146-6
                15781105
                fb7b5554-c31d-4ff6-8e3f-f9bdc8645ad3
                © 2005

                http://www.elsevier.com/tdm/userlicense/1.0/

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