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      Very large remanent polarization in ferroelectric Hf1-xZrxO2 grown on Ge substrates by plasma assisted atomic oxygen deposition

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          Most cited references 26

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          Ferroelectricity in hafnium oxide thin films

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            Use of negative capacitance to provide voltage amplification for low power nanoscale devices.

            It is well-known that conventional field effect transistors (FETs) require a change in the channel potential of at least 60 mV at 300 K to effect a change in the current by a factor of 10, and this minimum subthreshold slope S puts a fundamental lower limit on the operating voltage and hence the power dissipation in standard FET-based switches. Here, we suggest that by replacing the standard insulator with a ferroelectric insulator of the right thickness it should be possible to implement a step-up voltage transformer that will amplify the gate voltage thus leading to values of S lower than 60 mV/decade and enabling low voltage/low power operation. The voltage transformer action can be understood intuitively as the result of an effective negative capacitance provided by the ferroelectric capacitor that arises from an internal positive feedback that in principle could be obtained from other microscopic mechanisms as well. Unlike other proposals to reduce S, this involves no change in the basic physics of the FET and thus does not affect its current drive or impose other restrictions.
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              Ferroelectricity and Antiferroelectricity of Doped Thin HfO2-Based Films

              The recent progress in ferroelectricity and antiferroelectricity in HfO2-based thin films is reported. Most ferroelectric thin film research focuses on perovskite structure materials, such as Pb(Zr,Ti)O3, BaTiO3, and SrBi2Ta2O9, which are considered to be feasible candidate materials for non-volatile semiconductor memory devices. However, these conventional ferroelectrics suffer from various problems including poor Si-compatibility, environmental issues related to Pb, large physical thickness, low resistance to hydrogen, and small bandgap. In 2011, ferroelectricity in Si-doped HfO2 thin films was first reported. Various dopants, such as Si, Zr, Al, Y, Gd, Sr, and La can induce ferro-electricity or antiferroelectricity in thin HfO2 films. They have large remanent polarization of up to 45 μC cm(-2), and their coercive field (≈1-2 MV cm(-1)) is larger than conventional ferroelectric films by approximately one order of magnitude. Furthermore, they can be extremely thin ( 5 eV). These differences are believed to overcome the barriers of conventional ferroelectrics in memory applications, including ferroelectric field-effect-transistors and three-dimensional capacitors. Moreover, the coupling of electric and thermal properties of the antiferroelectric thin films is expected to be useful for various applications, including energy harvesting/storage, solid-state-cooling, and infrared sensors.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Applied Physics Letters
                Appl. Phys. Lett.
                AIP Publishing
                0003-6951
                1077-3118
                March 18 2019
                March 18 2019
                : 114
                : 11
                : 112901
                Affiliations
                [1 ]National Centre for Scientific Research “Demokritos,” 15310 Athens, Greece
                [2 ]Physics Department, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 15772 Athens, Greece
                [3 ]National Institute for Materials Physics, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele, Romania
                Article
                10.1063/1.5090036
                © 2019
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