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      VDAC, a multi-functional mitochondrial protein regulating cell life and death.

      Molecular Aspects of Medicine
      Animals, Apoptosis, physiology, Humans, Mice, Mitochondria, Signal Transduction, Voltage-Dependent Anion Channels

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          Abstract

          Research over the past decade has extended the prevailing view of the mitochondrion to include functions well beyond the generation of cellular energy. It is now recognized that mitochondria play a crucial role in cell signaling events, inter-organellar communication, aging, cell proliferation, diseases and cell death. Thus, mitochondria play a central role in the regulation of apoptosis (programmed cell death) and serve as the venue for cellular decisions leading to cell life or death. One of the mitochondrial proteins controlling cell life and death is the voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), also known as mitochondrial porin. VDAC, located in the mitochondrial outer membrane, functions as gatekeeper for the entry and exit of mitochondrial metabolites, thereby controlling cross-talk between mitochondria and the rest of the cell. VDAC is also a key player in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Thus, in addition to regulating the metabolic and energetic functions of mitochondria, VDAC appears to be a convergence point for a variety of cell survival and cell death signals mediated by its association with various ligands and proteins. In this article, we review what is known about the VDAC channel in terms of its structure, relevance to ATP rationing, Ca(2+) homeostasis, protection against oxidative stress, regulation of apoptosis, involvement in several diseases and its role in the action of different drugs. In light of our recent findings and the recently solved NMR- and crystallography-based 3D structures of VDAC1, the focus of this review will be on the central role of VDAC in cell life and death, addressing VDAC function in the regulation of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis with an emphasis on structure-function relations. Understanding structure-function relationships of VDAC is critical for deciphering how this channel can perform such a variety of functions, all important for cell life and death. This review also provides insight into the potential of VDAC1 as a rational target for new therapeutics.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          20346371
          10.1016/j.mam.2010.03.002

          Chemistry
          Animals,Apoptosis,physiology,Humans,Mice,Mitochondria,Signal Transduction,Voltage-Dependent Anion Channels

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