Blog
About

43
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
1 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: found
      • Article: not found

      The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity.

      Nature

      Signal Transduction, genetics, Apoptosis, Cell Adhesion, Cell Cycle, Cell Polarity, Cell Proliferation, Evolution, Molecular, Genes, Genome, Genomics, Humans, Immunity, Innate, Models, Biological, Neurons, metabolism, Phosphotransferases, chemistry, Phylogeny, Porifera, anatomy & histology, cytology, immunology, Sequence Analysis, DNA, Animals

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPMC
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Sponges are an ancient group of animals that diverged from other metazoans over 600 million years ago. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef, and show that it is remarkably similar to other animal genomes in content, structure and organization. Comparative analysis enabled by the sequencing of the sponge genome reveals genomic events linked to the origin and early evolution of animals, including the appearance, expansion and diversification of pan-metazoan transcription factor, signalling pathway and structural genes. This diverse 'toolkit' of genes correlates with critical aspects of all metazoan body plans, and comprises cell cycle control and growth, development, somatic- and germ-cell specification, cell adhesion, innate immunity and allorecognition. Notably, many of the genes associated with the emergence of animals are also implicated in cancer, which arises from defects in basic processes associated with metazoan multicellularity.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 3

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Selection of conserved blocks from multiple alignments for their use in phylogenetic analysis.

           J Castresana (2000)
          The use of some multiple-sequence alignments in phylogenetic analysis, particularly those that are not very well conserved, requires the elimination of poorly aligned positions and divergent regions, since they may not be homologous or may have been saturated by multiple substitutions. A computerized method that eliminates such positions and at the same time tries to minimize the loss of informative sites is presented here. The method is based on the selection of blocks of positions that fulfill a simple set of requirements with respect to the number of contiguous conserved positions, lack of gaps, and high conservation of flanking positions, making the final alignment more suitable for phylogenetic analysis. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, alignments of 10 mitochondrial proteins from several completely sequenced mitochondrial genomes belonging to diverse eukaryotes were used as examples. The percentages of removed positions were higher in the most divergent alignments. After removing divergent segments, the amino acid composition of the different sequences was more uniform, and pairwise distances became much smaller. Phylogenetic trees show that topologies can be different after removing conserved blocks, particularly when there are several poorly resolved nodes. Strong support was found for the grouping of animals and fungi but not for the position of more basal eukaryotes. The use of a computerized method such as the one presented here reduces to a certain extent the necessity of manually editing multiple alignments, makes the automation of phylogenetic analysis of large data sets feasible, and facilitates the reproduction of the final alignment by other researchers.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Coordination in Sponges. The Foundations of Integration

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: not found
              • Article: not found

              Characterization of the receptor protein-tyrosine kinase gene from the marine sponge Geodia cydonium.

                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                10.1038/nature09201
                3130542
                20686567

                Comments

                Comment on this article