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      Microbial terroir: associations between soil microbiomes and the flavor chemistry of mustard ( Brassica juncea)

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          Summary

          • Here, we characterized the independent role of soil microbiomes (bacterial and fungal communities) in determining the flavor chemistry of harvested mustard seed ( Brassica juncea). Given the known impacts of soil microbial communities on various plant characteristics, we hypothesized that differences in rhizosphere microbiomes would result in differences in seed flavor chemistry (glucosinolate content).

          • In a glasshouse study, we introduced distinct soil microbial communities to mustard plants growing in an otherwise consistent environment. At the end of the plant life cycle, we characterized the rhizosphere and root microbiomes and harvested produced mustard seeds for chemical characterization. Specifically, we measured the concentrations of glucosinolates, secondary metabolites known to create spicy and bitter flavors. We examined associations between rhizosphere microbial taxa or genes and seed flavor chemistry.

          • We identified links between the rhizosphere microbial community composition and the concentration of the main glucosinolate, allyl, in seeds. We further identified specific rhizosphere taxa predictive of seed allyl concentration and identified bacterial functional genes, namely genes for sulfur metabolism, which could partly explain the observed associations.

          • Together, this work offers insight into the potential influence of the belowground microbiome on the flavor of harvested crops.

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          Is Open Access

          Trimmomatic: a flexible trimmer for Illumina sequence data

          Motivation: Although many next-generation sequencing (NGS) read preprocessing tools already existed, we could not find any tool or combination of tools that met our requirements in terms of flexibility, correct handling of paired-end data and high performance. We have developed Trimmomatic as a more flexible and efficient preprocessing tool, which could correctly handle paired-end data. Results: The value of NGS read preprocessing is demonstrated for both reference-based and reference-free tasks. Trimmomatic is shown to produce output that is at least competitive with, and in many cases superior to, that produced by other tools, in all scenarios tested. Availability and implementation: Trimmomatic is licensed under GPL V3. It is cross-platform (Java 1.5+ required) and available at http://www.usadellab.org/cms/index.php?page=trimmomatic Contact: usadel@bio1.rwth-aachen.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.
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            Fast gapped-read alignment with Bowtie 2.

            As the rate of sequencing increases, greater throughput is demanded from read aligners. The full-text minute index is often used to make alignment very fast and memory-efficient, but the approach is ill-suited to finding longer, gapped alignments. Bowtie 2 combines the strengths of the full-text minute index with the flexibility and speed of hardware-accelerated dynamic programming algorithms to achieve a combination of high speed, sensitivity and accuracy.
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              DADA2: High resolution sample inference from Illumina amplicon data

              We present DADA2, a software package that models and corrects Illumina-sequenced amplicon errors. DADA2 infers sample sequences exactly, without coarse-graining into OTUs, and resolves differences of as little as one nucleotide. In several mock communities DADA2 identified more real variants and output fewer spurious sequences than other methods. We applied DADA2 to vaginal samples from a cohort of pregnant women, revealing a diversity of previously undetected Lactobacillus crispatus variants.
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                Author and article information

                Contributors
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                Journal
                New Phytologist
                New Phytologist
                Wiley
                0028-646X
                1469-8137
                March 29 2024
                Affiliations
                [1 ] Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado Boulder Boulder CO 80309 USA
                [2 ] Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology University of Colorado Boulder Boulder CO 80309 USA
                [3 ] Department of Soil and Crop Sciences Colorado State University Fort Collins CO 80523 USA
                [4 ] Department of Plant Sciences University of California Davis Davis CA 95616 USA
                Article
                10.1111/nph.19708
                40850d52-9f7a-4c3f-a42f-6efc408de50d
                © 2024

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