Blog
About

14
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Nanoplasmonic detection of adenosine triphosphate by aptamer regulated self-catalytic growth of single gold nanoparticles

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          We present a nanoplasmonic aptasensor for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by using single gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as probes. The specific aptamer-ATP binding induced conformational change could modulate the surface-dependent self-catalytic growth of GNPs, which enabled the detection of ATP with ultra-sensitivity and selectivity.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 27

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Biosensing with plasmonic nanosensors.

          Recent developments have greatly improved the sensitivity of optical sensors based on metal nanoparticle arrays and single nanoparticles. We introduce the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor and describe how its exquisite sensitivity to size, shape and environment can be harnessed to detect molecular binding events and changes in molecular conformation. We then describe recent progress in three areas representing the most significant challenges: pushing sensitivity towards the single-molecule detection limit, combining LSPR with complementary molecular identification techniques such as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, and practical development of sensors and instrumentation for routine use and high-throughput detection. This review highlights several exceptionally promising research directions and discusses how diverse applications of plasmonic nanoparticles can be integrated in the near future.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: not found
            • Article: not found

            Localized surface plasmon resonance sensors.

              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              Gold nanoparticles for biology and medicine.

              Gold colloids have fascinated scientists for over a century and are now heavily utilized in chemistry, biology, engineering, and medicine. Today these materials can be synthesized reproducibly, modified with seemingly limitless chemical functional groups, and, in certain cases, characterized with atomic-level precision. This Review highlights recent advances in the synthesis, bioconjugation, and cellular uses of gold nanoconjugates. There are now many examples of highly sensitive and selective assays based upon gold nanoconjugates. In recent years, focus has turned to therapeutic possibilities for such materials. Structures which behave as gene-regulating agents, drug carriers, imaging agents, and photoresponsive therapeutics have been developed and studied in the context of cells and many debilitating diseases. These structures are not simply chosen as alternatives to molecule-based systems, but rather for their new physical and chemical properties, which confer substantive advantages in cellular and medical applications.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                CHCOFS
                Chemical Communications
                Chem. Commun.
                Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC)
                1359-7345
                1364-548X
                2012
                2012
                : 48
                : 77
                : 9574
                Article
                10.1039/c2cc34632j
                22871726
                © 2012
                Product
                Self URI (article page): http://xlink.rsc.org/?DOI=c2cc34632j

                Comments

                Comment on this article