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      Microbial remediation of aromatics-contaminated soil

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      Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering

      Springer Nature

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          Most cited references 59

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          Biodiversity as a barrier to ecological invasion.

          Biological invasions are a pervasive and costly environmental problem that has been the focus of intense management and research activities over the past half century. Yet accurate predictions of community susceptibility to invasion remain elusive. The diversity resistance hypothesis, which argues that diverse communities are highly competitive and readily resist invasion, is supported by both theory and experimental studies conducted at small spatial scales. However, there is also convincing evidence that the relationship between the diversity of native and invading species is positive when measured at regional scales. Although this latter relationship may arise from extrinsic factors, such as resource heterogeneity, that covary with diversity of native and invading species at large scales, the mechanisms conferring greater invasion resistance to diverse communities at local scales remain unknown. Using neighbourhood analyses, a technique from plant competition studies, we show here that species diversity in small experimental grassland plots enhances invasion resistance by increasing crowding and species richness in localized plant neighbourhoods. Both the establishment (number of invaders) and success (proportion of invaders that are large) of invading plants are reduced. These results suggest that local biodiversity represents an important line of defence against the spread of invaders.
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            Principles of microbial PAH-degradation in soil.

            Interest in the biodegradation mechanisms and environmental fate of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is motivated by their ubiquitous distribution, their low bioavailability and high persistence in soil, and their potentially deleterious effect on human health. Due to high hydrophobicity and solid-water distribution ratios, PAHs tend to interact with non-aqueous phases and soil organic matter and, as a consequence, become potentially unavailable for microbial degradation since bacteria are known to degrade chemicals only when they are dissolved in water. As the aqueous solubility of PAHs decreases almost logarithmically with increasing molecular mass, high-molecular weight PAHs ranging in size from five to seven rings are of special environmental concern. Whereas several reviews have focussed on metabolic and ecological aspects of PAH degradation, this review discusses the microbial PAH-degradation with special emphasis on both biological and physico-chemical factors influencing the biodegradation of poorly available PAHs.
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              Bioremediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: current knowledge and future directions

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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Frontiers of Environmental Science & Engineering
                Front. Environ. Sci. Eng.
                Springer Nature
                2095-2201
                2095-221X
                April 2017
                December 6 2016
                April 2017
                : 11
                : 2
                Article
                10.1007/s11783-017-0894-x
                © 2017

                http://www.springer.com/tdm

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