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      Behavioral drive versus behavioral inertia in evolution: a null model approach.

      1 , ,
      The American naturalist
      University of Chicago Press

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          Abstract

          Some biologists embrace the classical view that changes in behavior inevitably initiate or drive evolutionary changes in other traits, yet others note that behavior sometimes inhibits evolutionary changes. Here we develop a null model that quantifies the impact of regulatory behaviors (specifically, thermoregulatory behaviors) on body temperature and on performance of ectotherms. We apply the model to data on a lizard (Anolis cristatellus) and show that thermoregulatory behaviors likely inhibit selection for evolutionary shifts in thermal physiology with altitude. Because behavioral adjustments are commonly used by ectotherms to regulate physiological performance, regulatory behaviors should generally constrain rather than drive evolution, a phenomenon we call the "Bogert effect." We briefly review a few other examples that contradict the classical view of behavior as the inevitable driving force in evolution. Overall, our analysis and brief review challenge the classical view that behavior is invariably the driving force in evolution, and instead our work supports the alternative view that behavior has diverse--and sometimes conflicting--effects on the directions and rates at which other traits evolve.

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          Author and article information

          Journal
          Am Nat
          The American naturalist
          University of Chicago Press
          0003-0147
          0003-0147
          Mar 2003
          : 161
          : 3
          Affiliations
          [1 ] Department of Biology, Box 351800, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. hueyrb@u.washington.edu
          Article
          10.1086/346135
          12699218
          7fa21e65-dcbc-4f5a-b9a3-25e2a718117a
          History

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