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      Effect of Dialysis Dose on Nutritional Status of Children on Chronic Hemodialysis

      , ,

      Nephron

      S. Karger AG

      Pediatric hemodialysis, Protein catabolic rate in children

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          Abstract

          It had been suggested that larger hemodialysis (HD) doses in children could result in better appetite, higher protein intake, better nutritional status and better growth. We investigated how different HD doses affect protein intake and nutritional status of children on chronic HD. Indices of nutritional status used were normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) calculated by formal 3-sample urea kinetic modeling and serum albumin level. Data of 38 HD sessions in 15 stable patients (6 males, 9 females) aged 14.5 ± 3.28 years (mean ± SD) were analyzed. HD sessions were divided into three groups based on delivered Kt/V: group 1 (n = 5), inadequate (Kt/V < 1.3, mean 1.05 ± 0.14); group 2 (n = 12), adequate (Kt/V = 1.3–1.6, mean 1.50 ± 0.07) and group 3 (n = 21), high (Kt/V >1.6, mean 1.94 ± 0.22). Mean nPCR and Kt/V per patient during the studied week were estimated for 11 patients in whom 3 HD sessions were available within the 38 sessions analyzed. Serum albumin level was adequate in all patients (43.77 ± 2.28 g/l). Mean overall Kt/V and nPCR were 1.68 ± 0.36 and 1.26 ± 0.23, respectively, r = 0.430. Average nPCR differed between groups depending on Kt/V. It was lowest in group 1 (1.01 ± 0.12 g/kg/day) where the highest correlation between nPCR and Kt/V was found (r = 0.648). nPCR was higher and similar in groups 2 (1.27 ± 0.23 g/kg/day) and 3 (1.31 ± 0.22 g/kg/day), with low correlation coefficients between nPCR and Kt/V in both groups (r = 0.275 and r = 0.197, respectively). A weak positive correlation (r = 0.249) between nPCR and Kt/V was found when average weekly values per patient (n = 11) were analyzed. Results of groups 1 and 2 confirm, what is already well established in adults, that adequate dialysis needs to be achieved in order to insure good protein intake. However, our data clearly show that nPCR did not increase with a further increase in delivered HD dose, i.e. Kt/V >1.6. Our results show that the nutritional status of children on chronic HD does not seem to benefit from very high HD doses (Kt/V >1.6).

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          Effects of Postdialysis Urea Rebound on the Quantification of Pediatric Hemodialysis

          Urea rebound (UR) causes single pool urea kinetic modeling (UKM), which is based on end-dialysis urea instead of its equilibrated value (Ceq), to erroneously quantify hemodialysis (HD) treatment. We estimated the impact of postdialysis UR on the results of formal variable volume single pool (VVSP) UKM [Kt/V, urea distribution volume (V), urea generation rate (G), normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR), and urea reduction ratio (URR)] in children on chronic HD. Thirty-eight standard pediatric HD sessions in 15 stable patients (9 female, 6 male) aged 14.5 ± (SD) 3.28 years were investigated. The HD sessions lasted 3.75 ± 0.43 h. The single pool urea clearance was 4.84 ± 1.25 ml/min/kg. All HD sessions were evaluated by VVSP and URR (%) with postdialysis urea taken at the end of HD and with Ceq taken 60 min after the end of HD, incorporating double pool effects and representing true double pool values. The anthropometric V was calculated by Cheek and Mellits formulae for children. VVSP significantly overestimated Kt/V by 0.26 ± 0.18 U (1.68 ± 0.36 vs. 1.42 ± 0.30, p 0.05). We conclude that UR has a significant effect on all results of UKM even after standard pediatric HD, and the degree of this efffect is documented. We suggest an increase of the minimum required prescribed single pool Kt/V in children and reduction of any delivered single pool Kt/V by approxiamtely 0.26 Kt/V U. Overestimation of nPCR by approximately 0.08 g/kg/day and underestimation of V by 8.5% should be kept in mind.
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            Author and article information

            Journal
            NEF
            Nephron
            10.1159/issn.1660-8151
            Nephron
            S. Karger AG
            1660-8151
            2235-3186
            2001
            2001
            22 June 2001
            : 88
            : 3
            : 273-275
            Affiliations
            University Children’s Hospital, Belgrade, Serbia
            Article
            46002 Nephron 2001;88:273–275
            10.1159/000046002
            11423761
            © 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

            Copyright: All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be translated into other languages, reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, microcopying, or by any information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from the publisher. Drug Dosage: The authors and the publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text are in accord with current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions, the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any changes in indications and dosage and for added warnings and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new and/or infrequently employed drug. Disclaimer: The statements, opinions and data contained in this publication are solely those of the individual authors and contributors and not of the publishers and the editor(s). The appearance of advertisements or/and product references in the publication is not a warranty, endorsement, or approval of the products or services advertised or of their effectiveness, quality or safety. The publisher and the editor(s) disclaim responsibility for any injury to persons or property resulting from any ideas, methods, instructions or products referred to in the content or advertisements.

            Page count
            Figures: 1, Tables: 1, References: 7, Pages: 3
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            Self URI (application/pdf): https://www.karger.com/Article/Pdf/46002
            Categories
            Short Communication

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