Blog
About

24
views
0
recommends
+1 Recommend
0 collections
    0
    shares
      • Record: found
      • Abstract: not found
      • Article: not found

      Identification and Structural Characterization of the ATP/ADP-Binding Site in the Hsp90 Molecular Chaperone

      , , , , ,

      Cell

      Elsevier BV

      Read this article at

      ScienceOpenPublisherPubMed
      Bookmark
          There is no author summary for this article yet. Authors can add summaries to their articles on ScienceOpen to make them more accessible to a non-specialist audience.

          Abstract

          Hsp90 molecular chaperones in eukaryotic cells play essential roles in the folding and activation of a range of client proteins involved in cell cycle regulation, steroid hormone responsiveness, and signal transduction. The biochemical mechanism of Hsp90 is poorly understood, and the involvement of ATP in particular is controversial. Crystal structures of complexes between the N-terminal domain of the yeast Hsp90 chaperone and ADP/ATP unambiguously identify a specific adenine nucleotide binding site homologous to the ATP-binding site of DNA gyrase B. This site is the same as that identified for the antitumor agent geldanamycin, suggesting that geldanamycin acts by blocking the binding of nucleotides to Hsp90 and not the binding of incompletely folded client polypeptides as previously suggested. These results finally resolve the question of the direct involvement of ATP in Hsp90 function.

          Related collections

          Most cited references 30

          • Record: found
          • Abstract: found
          • Article: not found

          Rapid measurement of binding constants and heats of binding using a new titration calorimeter.

          A new titration calorimeter is described and results are presented for the binding of cytidine 2'-monophosphate (2'CMP) to the active site of ribonuclease A. The instrument characteristics include very high sensitivity, rapid calorimetric response, and fast thermal equilibration. Convenient software is available for instrument operation, data collection, data reduction, and deconvolution to obtain least-squares estimates of binding parameters n, delta H degree, delta S degree, and the binding constant K. Sample through-put for the instrument is high, and under favorable conditions binding constants as large as 10(8) M-1 can be measured. The bovine ribonuclease A (RNase)/2'CMP system was studied over a 50-fold range of RNase concentration and at two different temperatures. The binding constants were in the 10(5) to 10(6) M-1 range, depending on conditions, and heats of binding ca. -15,000 cal/mol. Repeat determinations suggested errors of only a few percent in n, delta H degree, and K values over the most favorable concentration range.
            Bookmark
            • Record: found
            • Abstract: found
            • Article: not found

            Structural analysis of substrate binding by the molecular chaperone DnaK.

            DnaK and other members of the 70-kilodalton heat-shock protein (hsp70) family promote protein folding, interaction, and translocation, both constitutively and in response to stress, by binding to unfolded polypeptide segments. These proteins have two functional units: a substrate-binding portion binds the polypeptide, and an adenosine triphosphatase portion facilitates substrate exchange. The crystal structure of a peptide complex with the substrate-binding unit of DnaK has now been determined at 2.0 angstroms resolution. The structure consists of a beta-sandwich subdomain followed by alpha-helical segments. The peptide is bound to DnaK in an extended conformation through a channel defined by loops from the beta sandwich. An alpha-helical domain stabilizes the complex, but does not contact the peptide directly. This domain is rotated in the molecules of a second crystal lattice, which suggests a model of conformation-dependent substrate binding that features a latch mechanism for maintaining long lifetime complexes.
              Bookmark
              • Record: found
              • Abstract: found
              • Article: not found

              hsp82 is an essential protein that is required in higher concentrations for growth of cells at higher temperatures.

              hsp82 is one of the most highly conserved and abundantly synthesized heat shock proteins of eucaryotic cells. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains two closely related genes in the HSP82 gene family. HSC82 was expressed constitutively at a very high level and was moderately induced by high temperatures. HSP82 was expressed constitutively at a much lower level and was more strongly induced by heat. Site-directed disruption mutations were produced in both genes. Cells homozygous for both mutations did not grow at any temperature. Cells carrying other combinations of the HSP82 and HSC82 mutations grew well at 25 degrees C, but their ability to grow at higher temperatures varied with gene copy number. Thus, HSP82 and HSC82 constitute an essential gene family in yeast cells. Although the two proteins had different patterns of expression, they appeared to have equivalent functions; growth at higher temperatures required higher concentrations of either protein. Biochemical analysis of hsp82 from vertebrate cells suggests that the protein binds to a variety of other cellular proteins, keeping them inactive until they have reached their proper intracellular location or have received the proper activation signal. We speculate that the reason cells require higher concentrations of hsp82 or hsc82 for growth at higher temperatures is to maintain proper levels of complex formation with these other proteins.
                Bookmark

                Author and article information

                Journal
                Cell
                Cell
                Elsevier BV
                00928674
                July 1997
                July 1997
                : 90
                : 1
                : 65-75
                Article
                10.1016/S0092-8674(00)80314-1
                9230303
                © 1997

                Comments

                Comment on this article