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      Comparison of decomposition rate of hind limbs of preserved mice with ethanol-glycerin and formaldehyde of advanced fixative solution

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          Abstract

          Learning anatomy in medical school is still closely based on the use of cadavers. The burial of preserved cadaver poses a problem, specifically, it contaminates the soil with formalin. Many studies have been conducted to find an alternative fixative to update or modify formalin usage. One of them is ethanol-glycerin (EG), which suggests promising results. Despite that fact, there has yet to be any research comparing the decomposition rate between EG and formalin. This study is conducted to compare the rate of decomposition between the two fixative solutions, EG and 4% formalin on the hind limb of mice. The mice were first preserved using a standard primary fixative solution which is 10% formalin, following that procedure is preservation using advanced fixative solution, EG or 4% formalin. Upon completing the preservation steps, the mice were buried for 6 weeks and observed weekly. The stages of decomposition were assessed semi-quantitatively depending on its appearance. The hind limbs of mice that were fixed with EG solution managed to reach the last stage of decomposition, dry & remains, while the 4% formalin group of mice still remained in the previous stage, advanced decay. It is concluded that the mice hind limbs that have been previously preserved with EG advanced fixative solution has a faster decomposition rate compared to 4% formalin.

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          Most cited references21

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          How informative is the mouse for human gut microbiota research?

          The microbiota of the human gut is gaining broad attention owing to its association with a wide range of diseases, ranging from metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity and type 2 diabetes) to autoimmune diseases (such as inflammatory bowel disease and type 1 diabetes), cancer and even neurodevelopmental disorders (e.g. autism). Having been increasingly used in biomedical research, mice have become the model of choice for most studies in this emerging field. Mouse models allow perturbations in gut microbiota to be studied in a controlled experimental setup, and thus help in assessing causality of the complex host-microbiota interactions and in developing mechanistic hypotheses. However, pitfalls should be considered when translating gut microbiome research results from mouse models to humans. In this Special Article, we discuss the intrinsic similarities and differences that exist between the two systems, and compare the human and murine core gut microbiota based on a meta-analysis of currently available datasets. Finally, we discuss the external factors that influence the capability of mouse models to recapitulate the gut microbiota shifts associated with human diseases, and investigate which alternative model systems exist for gut microbiota research.
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            The mouse ascending: perspectives for human-disease models.

            The laboratory mouse is widely considered the model organism of choice for studying the diseases of humans, with whom they share 99% of their genes. A distinguished history of mouse genetic experimentation has been further advanced by the development of powerful new tools to manipulate the mouse genome. The recent launch of several international initiatives to analyse the function of all mouse genes through mutagenesis, molecular analysis and phenotyping underscores the utility of the mouse for translating the information stored in the human genome into increasingly accurate models of human disease.
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              Chemical and physical basics of routine formaldehyde fixation

              Formaldehyde is the widely employed fixative that has been studied for decades. The chemistry of fixation has been studied widely since the early 20th century. However, very few studies have been focused on the actual physics/chemistry aspect of process of this fixation. This article attempts to explain the chemistry of formaldehyde fixation and also to study the physical aspects involved in the fixation. The factors involved in the fixation process are discussed using well documented mathematical and physical formulae. The deeper understanding of these factors will enable pathologist to optimize the factors and use them in their favor.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Anat Cell Biol
                Anat Cell Biol
                Anatomy & Cell Biology
                Korean Association of Anatomists
                2093-3665
                2093-3673
                30 June 2021
                30 June 2021
                30 June 2021
                : 54
                : 2
                : 225-231
                Affiliations
                [1 ]Undergraduate Program of Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta
                [2 ]Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta, Indonesia
                Author notes
                Corresponding author:, Ria Margiana, Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Indonesia, Jakarta 10430, Indonesia, E-mail: ria.margiana11@ 123456gmail.com
                Article
                acb-54-2-225
                10.5115/acb.20.314
                8225480
                33767018
                d01d9073-1bf5-4c3e-85d4-f8b3223651f8
                Copyright © 2021. Anatomy & Cell Biology

                This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Original Article

                Cell biology
                burial,glycerol,mice,preservation
                Cell biology
                burial, glycerol, mice, preservation

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