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      Bioinformatics enrichment tools: paths toward the comprehensive functional analysis of large gene lists

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      Nucleic Acids Research

      Oxford University Press

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          Abstract

          Functional analysis of large gene lists, derived in most cases from emerging high-throughput genomic, proteomic and bioinformatics scanning approaches, is still a challenging and daunting task. The gene-annotation enrichment analysis is a promising high-throughput strategy that increases the likelihood for investigators to identify biological processes most pertinent to their study. Approximately 68 bioinformatics enrichment tools that are currently available in the community are collected in this survey. Tools are uniquely categorized into three major classes, according to their underlying enrichment algorithms. The comprehensive collections, unique tool classifications and associated questions/issues will provide a more comprehensive and up-to-date view regarding the advantages, pitfalls and recent trends in a simpler tool-class level rather than by a tool-by-tool approach. Thus, the survey will help tool designers/developers and experienced end users understand the underlying algorithms and pertinent details of particular tool categories/tools, enabling them to make the best choices for their particular research interests.

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          Most cited references 71

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          Gene ontology: tool for the unification of biology. The Gene Ontology Consortium.

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            DAVID: Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery.

            Functional annotation of differentially expressed genes is a necessary and critical step in the analysis of microarray data. The distributed nature of biological knowledge frequently requires researchers to navigate through numerous web-accessible databases gathering information one gene at a time. A more judicious approach is to provide query-based access to an integrated database that disseminates biologically rich information across large datasets and displays graphic summaries of functional information. Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery (DAVID; http://www.david.niaid.nih.gov) addresses this need via four web-based analysis modules: 1) Annotation Tool - rapidly appends descriptive data from several public databases to lists of genes; 2) GoCharts - assigns genes to Gene Ontology functional categories based on user selected classifications and term specificity level; 3) KeggCharts - assigns genes to KEGG metabolic processes and enables users to view genes in the context of biochemical pathway maps; and 4) DomainCharts - groups genes according to PFAM conserved protein domains. Analysis results and graphical displays remain dynamically linked to primary data and external data repositories, thereby furnishing in-depth as well as broad-based data coverage. The functionality provided by DAVID accelerates the analysis of genome-scale datasets by facilitating the transition from data collection to biological meaning.
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              FatiGO: a web tool for finding significant associations of Gene Ontology terms with groups of genes.

              We present a simple but powerful procedure to extract Gene Ontology (GO) terms that are significantly over- or under-represented in sets of genes within the context of a genome-scale experiment (DNA microarray, proteomics, etc.). Said procedure has been implemented as a web application, FatiGO, allowing for easy and interactive querying. FatiGO, which takes the multiple-testing nature of statistical contrast into account, currently includes GO associations for diverse organisms (human, mouse, fly, worm and yeast) and the TrEMBL/Swissprot GOAnnotations@EBI correspondences from the European Bioinformatics Institute.
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                Author and article information

                Journal
                Nucleic Acids Res
                Nucleic Acids Res
                nar
                nar
                Nucleic Acids Research
                Oxford University Press
                0305-1048
                1362-4962
                January 2009
                25 November 2008
                25 November 2008
                : 37
                : 1
                : 1-13
                Affiliations
                Laboratory of Immunopathogenesis and Bioinformatics, Clinical Services Program, SAIC-Frederick, Inc., National Cancer Institute at Frederick, Frederick, MD 21702, USA
                Author notes
                *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Tel: +1 301 846 5093; Fax: +1 301 846 6762; Email: rlempicki@ 123456mail.nih.gov

                The authors wish it to be known that, in their opinion, the first two authors should be regarded as joint First Authors.

                Article
                gkn923
                10.1093/nar/gkn923
                2615629
                19033363
                © 2008 The Author(s)

                This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

                Categories
                Survey and Summary

                Genetics

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